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The Saipan Suicides

January 23, 2017 rehadlock 0

    On June 15, 1944, the 2nd and 4th United States Marine divisions, who had nick-named themselves the “Apple-Knockers” landed on the shores of Saipan. A few days later they were joined by the inexperienced 27th division of the New York National Guard. The three divisions were comprised of 71,000 U.S. soldiers who were charged with the task of carrying out ‘Operation Forager’. This operation was a critical strategical maneuver to the war; The intent of the attack was for Allied troops to gain control over the island. Saipan, part of the Mariana Islands chain in the western Pacific Ocean is located 2,250 […]

10 Truly Horrifying Photographs of Atrocities Committed by the Nazi Party

January 20, 2017 rehadlock 2

    Learn more about Aktion T4       Follow @PostMortem_Post on Twitter and Like us on Facebook! If you enjoyed this article, you might also like Aktion T4: The Nazi’s First Mass Murder Program, Series of Photographs Depicting the Act of Seppuku (Japanese Ritual Suicide) During WWII,  Decorated WWI Soldier Spares Hitler’s Life, The Demmin Suicides, ,  Mummified Body of WWII Pilot Discovered 66 Years Later, The Bombing of Guernica and Eerily Beautiful Vintage Crime Scene Photos  

Aktion T4: The Nazi Party’s First Mass Murder Program

January 18, 2017 rehadlock 0

The Nazi Party is most infamously known for perpetrating the Holocaust, a mass genocide of eleven-million “undesirables” during the reign of Hitler. However, many of the methods used during the Holocaust, including the use of the gas chamber, was developed during the Nazi’s first mass murder program: Aktion T4.   Aktion T4, which predated the Holocaust by two years, was an involuntary euthanasia program established by Adolf Hitler that focused on eliminating “life unworthy of life”. This program, which lasted from September 1939 until August 1941, was led by Philipp Bouhler, director of Hitler’s private chancellery and Karl Brandt, Hitler’s […]

The Demmin Suicides

January 16, 2017 rehadlock 0

During World War II the population of the small town of Demmin, Germany doubled due to an influx of refugees from the east. By 1945, 15,000-16,000 people were inhabiting the town, located just north of Berlin in the German province of Pomerania (modern-day MecKlenburg-Vorpommern). Demmin sat on a small peninsula with three sides of the town surrounded by the Peene and Tollense Rivers. In April of 1945, following the Battle of Berlin, the Eastern Front grew ever closer to Demmin. Women, children and the elderly were forced by German troops to dig a 5 kilometer (3.1 mile) long tank ditch […]

The Lurid Case of The Black Dahlia: Unsolved 70 Years Later

January 15, 2017 rehadlock 0

At 11:07 AM on January 15, 1947, housewife Betty Bersinger and her three-year-old daughter were walking from their home on Norton Avenue in the Leimert Park neighborhood of Los Angeles to a nearby shoe repair shop. Development in Leimer Park had been halted at the onset of World War II and was still largely comprised of overgrown land. As the two walked down the west side of the 3800 block of South Norton Avenue that dreary morning, Betty spotted what she believed was a mannequin lying in a vacant lot, near the sidewalk; It’s top and bottom half were disconnected […]

The Horrific History of the Cecil Hotel

January 4, 2017 rehadlock 0

The Cecil Hotel in downtown Los Angeles has seen more than its fair share of suicides, murders and mysterious disappearances since its opening in 1927. Built on Main Street, an up-and-coming area of the city, the opulent, art deco-style hotel promised to draw in affluent tourists and businessmen. Unfortunately, just a few years after its opening, the Great Depression hit, turning Main Street into skid row and forcing The Cecil to become a budget hotel.  Over the years, The Cecil has certainly made a name for itself. During the 50s and 60s, the location was a popular destination for suicides; So […]

The Iroquois Theatre Fire, “A Climax of Holiday Horrors”

December 29, 2016 rehadlock 0

   On Wednesday, December 30, 1903 the Iroquois Theatre in Chicago, Illinois was holding a matinee of the musical comedy Mr. Bluebeard‘, starring the popular comedian, Eddie Foy.   he luxury, Renaissance-style theatre had opened only a few weeks prior on November 23 and was touted as being “fireproof beyond all doubt”. Despite rushing to finish construction on the 1.1 million dollar theatre in time for the holiday busy season, the Iroquois had failed, so far, in attracting large audiences.    ut on December 30, 1903, more than two-thousand people flocked to see the matinee of Mr. Bluebeard. Although the theatre’s capacity was only 1,602, […]

Photographs Left Behind on the Battlefields of the U.S. Civil War

December 23, 2016 rehadlock 1

 The Museum of the Confederacy located inRichmond, Virginia is home to several antique photographs carried by soldiers who fought in the first American Civil War. Photos lost on the battlefield were often picked up by other soldiers and handed down through families. Over the years, some have made their way to the museum.  Unfortunately, the people in the photos have yet to be identified and as time goes on, the chances of ever knowing their names diminishes. Photo of an unidentified girl found on the battlefield at Port Republic, Virginia lying between the bodies of a Union and Confederate soldier. […]

Decorated WWI Soldier Spares Hitler’s Life

December 21, 2016 rehadlock 0

   On September 28, 1918 Private Henry Tandey, a British WWI soldier serving near the French village of Marcoing, happened upon a wounded German soldier. Out of compassion, Private Tandey chose to spare the young man’s life. Little did he know, his sympathy for this injured soldier would lead to the genocide of approximately 20 million people and bring about WWII; The German soldier Tandey spared was 29-year-old Adolf Hitler. Private Henry Tandey went on to become the most decorated private soldier in WWI. In 1923, a museum dedicated to Tandey’s regiment commissioned a painting from Italian war artist Fortunio Matania.   […]

John F. Kennedy’s Chilling Assassination Prediction

December 19, 2016 rehadlock 0

John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas. Many believe Kennedy anticipated, and possibly even predicted his own death. Chillingly, just before President Kennedy and First Lady Jackie Onassis left for Texas, the President told his wife, “We’re heading into nut country today. But Jackie, if somebody wants to shoot me from a window with a rifle, nobody can stop it, so why worry about it?”. The Kennedys arrived in Texas the evening before JFK’s assassination. It was a rainy night and hundreds of onlookers had gathered to greet them. […]

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