The Demmin Suicides

January 16, 2017 rehadlock 0

During World War II the population of the small town of Demmin, Germany doubled due to an influx of refugees from the east. By 1945, 15,000-16,000 people were inhabiting the town, located just north of Berlin in the German province of Pomerania (modern-day MecKlenburg-Vorpommern). Demmin sat on a small peninsula with three sides of the town surrounded by the Peene and Tollense Rivers. In April of 1945, following the Battle of Berlin, the Eastern Front grew ever closer to Demmin. Women, children and the elderly were forced by German troops to dig a 5 kilometer (3.1 mile) long tank ditch […]

The Dark Childhood of Satanic Serial Killer Richard Ramirez

January 6, 2017 rehadlock 0

The Lurid Case of The Black Dahlia: Unsolved, 70 Years LaterRicardo Leyva Munoz Ramirez, the youngest of five siblings, was born February 29, 1960 in El Paso, Texas. Twenty-five years later, the world would come to know him as ‘The Nightstalker’, a serial killer and devout Satanist who terrorized the residents of California with his heinous crimes from 1984-1985. He is considered to be one of the most brutal serial killers to have ever lived, known for torturing and sexually assaulting his victims before killing them. He often mutilated the bodies or left behind Satanic symbolism, occasionally, forcing them to “swear on Satan” […]

Sister Smile is Dead: The Singing Nun’s Double-Suicide

April 29, 2016 rehadlock 0

    Jeanne-Paule “Jeanine” Marie Deckers, famously known as ‘The Singing Nun’, was born in Belgium on October 17, 1933. Her parents owned a bakery in Brussels and hoped Jeanine would one day take over the family business. Instead, she enrolled in art school in Paris which she attended only briefly; After a nervous breakdown prompted by a failed engagement, Jeanine dropped out of school and joined the Dominican Fichermont Convent near Waterloo in 1959 at the age of twenty-six. There, she made a vow of poverty and took the name ‘Sister Luc-Gabrielle’. For the first time Jeanine Deckers, who had had a self-described […]

‘Til Death Do Us Part: Couple Married 60 Years Buried in Double Coffin 

February 14, 2016 rehadlock 0

14 Most Violent Valentine’s Days 14 Most Violent Valentine’s Days   In 1921, Thomas Jefferson “Jeff” Souder and Mary Ellen Souder, a couple married for sixty years died less than 48 hours apart and were laid to rest in a double coffin. The two had contracted dysentery, known as “The Flux” at that time. Dysentery is a form of gastroenteritis, usually contacted by contaminated food and water. Without treatment, a person with dysentery will rapidly lose bodily fluids leading to dehydration and eventually, death. This disease was a common killer in the 19th and 20th century before the invention of […]

Postmortem Family Photos: The Keller Family

January 20, 2016 rehadlock 2

    In the Victorian era, postmortem photography, also known as ‘mourning portraiture’ was a common practice. Often, these photographs would be sent to family across the country with the expectation that they would be proudly displayed as a way to remember the deceased. Due to the extremely high cost of film in the nineteenth century, death was often one of the few occasions deemed important enough to photograph a relative or friend and violent death resulting in disfigurement was not cause to forgo the photo op. These photos ranged from a portrait of only the deceased subject, to an entire […]

Mummified Corpses of Little Girls Transformed into Russian Dolls

October 1, 2015 rehadlock 6

 During his childhood, Anatoly Moskvin’s parents would often take him for walks through graveyards in his hometown of Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. Today he is a 48-year-old writer/historian and expert on historical cemeteries in his native country. Moskvin has published thirteen books, speaks thirteen languages and has been described by many as a “genius”.  Despite his success in life, he was still living in a flat with his parents, Elvira (78) and Yury (78), in 2011. Moskvin’s parents would stay at their country home each summer leaving their son alone at their flat in Nizhny Novgorod. When the elderly couple returned early […]

The Baby Grave Tree

July 6, 2015 rehadlock 4

The Toraja people of Indonesia are known around the world for their bizarre funeral rites such as Ma’nene, “The Ceremony of Cleaning Corpses”. Usually, the Toraja bury their dead in limestone cliffs in order to more easily retrieve the remains of their relatives when the time comes for them to be exhumed, groomed and paraded around their village of birth before being returned to the grave. Sometimes the bodies of children are suspended from the sides of cliffs with rope beside rows of “Tau-Tau”, life-sized wooden effigies of deceased high-status citizens. When an infant passes away before they begin teething, the baby is buried in what is known as […]

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Longest Epitaph in America

February 25, 2015 rehadlock 0

The longest epitaph in the United States (and possibly the world) can be found at ‘Burial Place Hill’, a historical cemetery in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Written by Simeon Martin, the epitaph contains 407 words laying out in great detail his family tree, childhood, employment history and notable accomplishments, along with some of his favorite scripture and poetry. In fact, the only thing Martin left out was any mention of how incredibly long-winded he was in life and even in death. This would usually be the time I would provide a little background into the life of Simeon Martin, but there’s nothing that I […]